Nina Siegal is an author, editor and journalist from New York, who lives in Amsterdam. She graduated with a BA in English Literature from Cornell University and received her MFA in Fiction from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Nina has a 20-year history as a journalist and editor. Her journalistic writing has appeared in dozens of newspapers and magazines, including The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, W. Magazine, Art in America, 1stDibs.com, ArtNews, and Bloomberg News. Nina was the launching editor of Time Out Amsterdam magazine, which she ran as editor-in-chief until 2012; from 2012 to 2015 she was international managing editor of Flow Magazine, the English-language edition of Dutch Flow.

Nina has written two novels: THE ANATOMY LESSON (Nan A. Talese/Knopf Doubleday, 2014) and A LITTLE TROUBLE WITH THE FACTS (HarperCollins, 2008). For her fiction, she has received numerous grants and fellowships, including a Fulbright Fellowship in Creative Writing, two MacDowell Colony fellowships, and the post-graduate Jack Leggett Fellowship from Iowa. Her first novel was top finalist for the James Jones First Novel Fellowship.

"A literary page-turner that captures a story behind a masterpiece. [Siegal's] talent is in exploring the wrenching emotion of loss and the price that's paid for trying to understand human life."
Oprah Book of the Week, Editor's Pick

"Siegal succeeds in the task she has set for herself – to transmute her material into a work of art."
The New Yorker

"Siegal’s fascinating narrative conveys the pomp, graft, bustle and rough justice of 17th-century Holland through a multitude of voices."
The New York Times Book Review



"Siegal sets her splendid, gory second novel in 1632 in Amsterdam, where a thief's execution occasions a celebration, evoking "bloodlust" throughout the city on "Justice Day." ...Through masterful use of subtle details, embroidered into beautiful writing, Siegal suggests that art and violence often intertwine."
Publishers Weekly

"Virtually every sentence is drenched in the atmosphere of 17th-century Amsterdam. We feel as if we are walking at Rembrandt’s side, in a cell awaiting the execution of a thief, rushing through the streets with the condemned’s lover in hopes of saving him. This is a novel to be absorbed for its rich evocation of a single day when one man died and another rose to fame for his art... Brilliant."
Historical Novel Society, Editor's Choice

"Siegal takes one fascinating work of art and transmutes it into another."
Abigail Dalton, "If You Loved The Goldfinch: The Anatomy Lesson," on Everyday E Book.

"A thought-provoking and richly populated novel by a talented new voice."
Jeanette Zwart, Shelf Awareness

"Once in a rare while, you get to read a story of such breathtaking beauty and intelligence that you remember why you love to read. The Anatomy Lesson is just such a novel. In stunning prose, Nina Siegal animates Rembrandt’s first masterpiece, spinning a deeply affecting tale of love, loss and redemption as she reveals the secrets of the human soul. It is a gorgeous literary page turner of immense sympathy and elegance, equal in artistic élan to its inspiration. Brava!" — Robin Oliveira, author of My Name is Mary Sutter and I Always Loved You

"Rembrandt's 'The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp' is a narrative in paint which tells a story of Amsterdam in its Golden Age. Now, Nina Siegal's lovely novel dissects the dissection, evocatively translating the painted narrative into words, bringing a grim tableau to life and reanimating a moment in history when art, science, life, and death converged."
—Russell Shorto, author of Amsterdam: A History of the World's Most Liberal City

"Brilliantly structured, wonderfully evocative, filled with vivid characters, The Anatomy Lesson transports the reader to that day in 1632 when the coat thief Aris Kindt passed from life to death and from death, thanks first to Rembrandt and now Nina Siegal, into immortality."
— Margot Livesey, author of The Flight of Gemma Hardy

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THE ANATOMY LESSON (a novel) is published by Nan A. Talese/Knopf Doubleday in 2014. It will also be available in Dutch, Polish and Portuguese.

THE ANATOMY LESSON is currently available in hardcover (deckle edged), paperback and digital edition. The audio book was a finalist for the 2015 Audie Awards from the Audible Publishers Association in the category of multiple-voice performance.

BUYING OPTIONS: Support your local bookshop! THE ANATOMY LESSON is sold at most major bookshops and lots of independent bookshops. If you don't see it on the shelves, please ask for it or order it from your local bookshop. Help keep friendly local retailers thriving.

Amazon.com

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Barnes & Noble
Nina Siegal is a regular contributor to the International New York Times and The New York Times, writing about art and culture in Europe. Her journalistic work also currently appears in ARTnews, Sotheby's Magazine, 1stdibs.com and Flow Magazine, among others. She is the Creative Editor for the Amsterdam-based art magazine See All This. In the past, she's written for such publications as The Wall Street Journal, W. Magazine, Bloomberg News, The Scotsman, Art & Auction, Art in America, Ms. Magazine, The Progressive, and Salon.com. She began her career as a journalist at the San Francisco Bay Guardian in 1994, and has been contributing to The New York Times since 1997.

Here are some links to recent articles:

Touring Europe in the Footsteps of Van Gogh in The New York Times Travel section

Hieronymus Bosch is Credited with Work in Kansas City Museum in The New York Times Arts Section and the International New York Times World News section

Shedding New Light on the Late Dutch Artist Karel Appel in the International New York Times

Stolen Dutch Art Ends up in the Ukraine, But Getting it Back Isn't Easy in The New York Times and International New York Times

Profile of Beatrix Ruf and Her Isa Genzken Exhibition in the International New York Times

Victory in a Battle Over a Whistler? in the International New York Times

Mountains as a Muse for Kirchner in the International New York Times

Bosch, Revolutionary and Master in the International New York Times

Works from Zero Movement Lead Christie's Sale in the International New York Times

Old Master Selfies from the Peak of Dutch Painting in the International New York Times

Another Side of Gerhard Richter in the International New York Times

Exploring the Darker Side of Ceramics in the International New York Times

How China Conquered the Dutch in the International New York Times

William Kentridge at EYE Filmmuseum, a review in October 2015 ARTnews

Munch and Van Gogh: Together at Last in the International New York Times

France and The Netherlands Chip in to Buy Rembrandt Portraits in ArtsBeat column, New York Times

Rembrandt Portraits, Record Purchase from Rothschild Collection in The New York Times

Business Lunch with Beatrix Ruf in the Holland Herald magazine

A Matisse Comes Home, With Friends in the International New York Times

Disputed Painting is Declared an Authentic Rembrandt, The New York Times

Anton Corbijn: Capturing the Mood of the Music in The New York Times and The Boston Globe

In Amsterdam, a Tale of Wars, Friendship and Loves Lost in the International New York Times

William Kentridge: Bringing a Complex Opera to Heel in the International New York Times

In Amsterdam, Loving Rembrandt Again from The New York Times, Travel section

He Was More Than His Madness in the New York Times

Giving Artworks a Second Life, from the International New York Times

With Rembrandt, The Selfie Takes on New Meaning, in the International New York Times, Culture section

From Nightmare to Dream Come True For Michaela DePrince, in The New York Times

70 Years After his Death, Is Mondrian's Art Now Copyright Free? in the International New York Times

Together, the Jussen Brothers Plan to Part Ways in the International New York Times

Van Gogh's Pastoral Days in the International New York Times

Review of Marlene Dumas at the Stedelijk Museum in ARTnews

Funding Cuts for Midsize Art Spaces are Endangering Europe's Cultural Sector, in ArtNet.com News

Mariss Jansons Fights for a New Concert Hall in Munich in the International New York Times

The Faces Behind Amsterdam's Golden Age in the International New York Times

Into the Bizarre World of Ted Noten in the International New York Times

An Anatomy of 'The Anatomy Lesson' in ARTnews

Dutch Designers Make Luxury Copies in the International New York Times

Art Shapes a Civil Rights Debate in Russia in the International New York Times

Going Public: Chinese Private Art Museums Open to A Wider Audience in Sotheby's At Auction Magazine

Western Art Dealers Take a Different Approach to Hong Kong in the International New York Times

At Amsterdam Design Conference, A Call To Action in the International New York Times

Jewelry Design Exhibition Goes Back to the Future in the International New York Times

Van Gogh's True Palette Revealed in the New York Times

New Van Gogh Painting Discovered in Amsterdam in the New York Times

Masterworks for One and All in the New York Times

Rare Glimpse of the Elusive Kazimir Malevich in the International New York Times

This is a two-part series in Art in America about the European cultural budget cuts and how they're impacting the art world: Euro Crisis Hits Museums and The New Normal in Europe

The Rembrandt Connection, Jan Six in W. Magazine

Young Master, William Noortman in W. Magazine

Profile of Jasper Johns from The Scotsman, reprinted on artnet.com

Interview with graphic artist Art Spiegelman in The Progressive

Profile of Lars Sjoberg, Swedish Home Collector in Art and Auction

Interview with Viggo Mortensen in The Progressive

20th Century Design Makes Inroads at "Old Masters" Fair in the International New York Times

Expanding Latin American Art Market Rich in Adventure in the International New York Times

Buried Treasure Among Jewels at TEFAF in the International New York Times

Technology Mimics The Brushstrokes of the Masters in the International New York Times

Frieze Projects Finds Artistry in Decision Making in the International New York Times

Becoming Van Gogh: The Paris Years in the International New York Times

Francois Pinault's A Triple Tour: A Contemporary View of Confinement in the International New York Times

Amsterdam Celebrates "Prophets" of Post-Impressionism in the International New York Times

Wagner Veteran Offers His Final Laps of the Ring in the International New York Times


Lebanese Artist Explores "Human Face" of a Conflict
in the International New York Times

Demand Rises for Dutch Palette in Shades of White in the International New York Times

A Slice of Russia in Amsterdam in the International New York Times

Dutch Arts Scene Is Under Siege in the International New York Times

Just In Time, A Lebanese Artist's Work is Shown at Tate Modern in the International New York Times

Audio Tour is a Work of Art at Frieze in the International New York Times

Fragile Van Gogh Drawings See The Light in the International New York Times

Millionaire's Love of Art Spawns East-West Dialogue in the International New York Times

Haunted by War, Syrian Artist Puts Raw Emotions on View in the International New York Times

Restoring a Long-Missing Dutch Landmark in the International New York Times

Ancient Art Tells China's Modern Tale in the International New York Times

Persian Calligraphy Opens Door to Modern Art in the International New York Times

Art You Can Experience, But Not Buy in the International New York Times

An Iowa Town's Story Told in Portraits 21 Years Apart in the New York Times

Story of Salsa, Waiting to be Told in the New York Times

Harlem on the Brink in the New York Times

Can Harlem's Heritage Be Saved? in the New York Times

From the Subway to the Streets in the New York Times

Jennifer's Journey in the New York Times

Cannery Row Struggles to Stay True to Steinbeck Siegal's first bylined feature in in the New York Times

A Plague Undetected in Salon.com

The Crying Game in Salon.com

Slaves to the System in Salon.com

Lethal Lottery from POZ magazine
A LITTLE TROUBLE WITH THE FACTS was published in 2008 by HarperCollins. It was translated in to French (Marabout, Paris) and Dutch (Truth&Dare, Amsterdam) and is available as an audio book and a Kindle edition. It was the top finalist for the James Jones First Novel Award in 2008.

“WHAT YOU’LL LOVE: Siegal’s talent for nailing the details that illuminate an era -- from the mid-’80s art boom to the late ‘90s social swirl -- makes for a transporting read.” —Washington Post

“Siegal blends glamour and gutter into a delicious cocktail, equal parts behind-the-scenes dish and crime novel.” —Publishers Weekly

“Witty…Nina Siegal gets it right.” —Page Six, New York Post

“An absorbing tale. Siegal is a delightful writer.” —Associated Press

“A great read.” —Quick and Simple Magazine

“Siegal has subtly rejuvinated the (noir) genre.” —Brooklyn Rail Magazine

Great Debuts of 2008: “A combination of chick lit and crime fiction, this book transcends those genres with its sassy, witty prose and urban art-based plot.” —Rocky Mountain News




For Inquiries about THE ANATOMY LESSON, review copies, tour bookings, or speaking engagements please contact: Marly Rusoff & Associates, Inc.
PO Box 524
Bronxville, NY 10708, USA
Phone: 914-961-7939

Publisher:
Nan A. Talese/Knopf Doubleday
part of Random House
1745 Broadway
New York, NY 10019
ddaypub@randomhouse.com



Nina is available for freelance writing and editing assignments, or teaching opportunities via Amsterdam WritingArts.

To contact Nina directly:
ninasiegal at mac dot com

You can also find her at Flow Magazine:
nina dot siegal at sanoma dot com